Education, training and tools for ensuring healthcare frontline food safety

Food technology has been growing at a quick pace, having come under the influence of the twin paradigms of the late 20th century, technology and globalization. As populations keep moving from one part of the world to another in the millions; it is natural that they get influenced by the food behavior of the place to which they move, while also bringing their own influences into it.

It is not just with the itinerant population that food service and movement are paired and associated. They have become more pronounced as businesses in food products move their products to many parts of the world. Food produced in China may find its way to a plate in Chile, and Sri Lanka’s cuisine could be popular in Senegal.

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While this kind of movement is inevitable and is part of globalization; it has brought with it the imperative for cleanliness and hygiene. These critical aspects of food should not become a casualty to business interests. It is to ensure hygiene at all stages and levels of the food that is consumed all over the world that global and domestic regulatory agencies have come up with many regulations.

A host of regulations

These regulations are meant for implementation at different sources, such as hotels, restaurants, hospitals, public transport which moves millions of people from one part of the globe to another, and in every conceivable locale in which food is produced or consumed.

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These are just some of the standards that are in place to help bring about standardization in food production and distribution practices:

  • Administrators 483.60 Food & Nutrition Services Standard, specific to F361, which requires the facility to employ sufficient staff with the appropriate competencies and skills set
  • 60 Food & Nutrition Services Standard processes
  • Hospital A-0620 Food and Dietetic Services
  • HHA, CMS 3819-F Modernization, Continuous Quality Improvements
  • CMS Quality Indicator Process for Assistant Living Homes.

Full clarity on the regulations for healthcare food safety

A proper and complete understanding of all these aspects of healthcare frontline food safety will be offered at a webinar that is being organized by MentorHealth, a leading provider of professional trainings for all the areas of regulatory compliance. The speaker at this session, Larry David Bowe is a Principle Consultant- Food Safety Certified Instructor with 36 plus years of experience in Hospitality, Food Safety Management, will offer food safety education, training and tools.

Please enroll for this webinar and gain thorough insights into food safety education and tools.

All aspects of food training

Larry will focus on developing documentation that organizations can deploy. He will explain the kind of vision, mission, and messaging that food departments need to have, as well as how to shape the training, corrective action of staff, and the behaviors of individual food handlers. He will explain the role of food and nutrition staff, and other individuals such as volunteers, in reducing the risk of foodborne outbreaks.

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The webinar will also offer effective risk management strategies, and show how to adapt appropriate competencies and skills sets and tools to inculcate the right competencies and skills sets, as well as serving as the effective means of applying these. The training programs, methods and tools will help to correct improper food handling behaviors.

Larry will share tools, tips and resources to promote a cohesive food service and safety plan. He will cover the following areas at this valuable session:

  • Slides Presentation for Training Manager to Implementing Staff Training, Tools within department, and across facility
  • Online sources
  • Actual Training Program, Forms(actual inspector notes/inspection)
  • Tools-To-Used in Dining (Food) Service Audit/Survey Process “Readiness” to document, corrective actions, Performance improvement Action Plans, Healthcare Food Setting
  • Clear Messaging/Communication/Training for Events.
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Complementing MACRA and MIPS with HIPAA brings about better patient engagement

The Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015 (MACRA) is a federal Act that regulates the manner in which physicians have to be paid when they treat patients who come to them under Medicare. It modifies and supersedes the earlier legislation on this topic, namely the Balanced Budget Act, which was in force from 1997.

From the time the Balanced Budget Act linked physician payments to budget cuts and economic growth; it has reduced physician payments by over a fifth. In contrast, MACRA introduces Merit based Incentive Payment System (MIPS) and Advanced Alternative Payment Models (APM’s), which are “pay-for-performance” programs and are independent of the macroeconomic factors, upon which the earlier physician payments system was based.

Bringing about patient engagement is the basic purpose of MACRA

MACRA brings about patient engagement in a big way. This is one of the quintessential features of this legislation. MACRA uses advancing technologies to foster patient engagement tools that have become so essential a feature of the smart devices that the healthcare sector uses. Certified Electronic Health Record Technology (CEHRT) has enabled features such as availability of secure patient portals and encrypted text message and email products.

Because of this, patient engagement tools sent electronically by regular (unencrypted) email and text messaging include features such as appointment reminders, healthcare instructions, patient satisfaction surveys, and health and wellness newsletters and recall reminders. Since these are part of the regular use of technology in healthcare; HIPAA has enacted rules by which Protected Health Information (PHI) can be sent by unencrypted electronic transmission. This explains the clear and strong link between MACRA, MIPS and HIPAA.

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The first set of HIPAA rules came into effect when the HIPAA Omnibus Rule was passed in September 2013. Guidances from the U. S. Department of Health and Human Services in 2014 and 2016 followed these rules.

Pervasive violations

Despite the good intentions with which these HIPAA Rules and guidances have been enacted; Providers and Covered Entities, and their Business Associates have been violating the HIPAA Rules for communicating with patients by unencrypted email and text message. Lack of knowledge of the rules among them is attributed as the main reason for this. It is noticed that most providers and Covered Entities and Business Associates have very little knowledge of what a PHI as defined by HIPAA really is.

The antidote to this problem is provided by HIPAA itself, in the form of HIPAA Rules and HHS/OCR guidance. This guidance provides a simple and easy-to-use, three-step Safe Harbor for using unencrypted email and text messaging to engage patients. The highlight of this three-step HIPAA Safe Harbor is that it precludes Covered Entities and Business Associates from any responsibility or liability for unauthorized access to Protected Health Information (PHI) in unencrypted emails and text messages during transmission and after receipt by the patient.

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Clear learning about the three-step Safe Harbor

Understanding what this Safe Harbor is, and knowing how to apply it is very important for Covered Entities, Business Associates and providers. It is the only real means for them to stay compliant with the requirements set out in HIPAA and avoid causing violations to the HIPAA rules on communicating with patients by unencrypted email and text message.

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This is the learning a webinar from MentorHealth, a leading provider of professional trainings for the healthcare industry, will be offering. The speaker at this session is Paul R. Hales, an expert on HIPAA Privacy, Security, Breach notification and Enforcement Rules with a national HIPAA consulting practice based in St. Louis and the author of all content in The HIPAA E-Tool, an Internet-based, Software as a Service product for health care providers and Business Associates. Please register for this webinar.

Putting the HIPAA Safe Harbor in proper perspective

An explanation of the three-step HIPAA Safe Harbor is the core of this learning session. Paul will break down the steps, which is the basis to making the process easy to follow.

He will cover the following areas in this this webinar for HIPAA Covered Entities and Business Associates:

  • MACRA-MIPS – Patient Engagement – the Required Objective: Protecting Patient Health Information and Measure: HIPAA Risk Analysis
  • A clear explanation of the simple 3 Step HIPAA Safe Harbor that protects Covered Entities (and Business Associates acting on their behalf) from liability related to Patient Engagement by unencrypted email and text messaging
  • HIPAA Law that covers unencrypted email and text messages – What emails and text messages are subject to HIPAA Law
  • What Protected Health Information (PHI) really is – according to HIPAA – a clear explanation of how HIPAA defines PHI – it’s not just information about, for example, a diagnosis, disease, surgery or prescribed treatment
  • How a 2015 Federal Communications Commission Order about health care text messages added to confusion and what it really means – the 3 Step HIPAA Safe Harbor is the only text message Safe Harbor for Covered Entities and Business Associates
  • The absolute ban on unencrypted text messaging of PHI by Joint Commission in collaboration with the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS)
  • The interconnected liability of Covered Entities and Business Associates that provide unencrypted electronic patient engagement services like appointment reminders – and how both can protect themselves
  • Responsibility – and liability of Senior Management and Boards of Trustees.

HIPAA’s guidelines need to be understood to prepare for, prevent, respond and recover ransomware

Ransomware is dangerous and malicious software that infects the operating systems of computers that are vulnerable. It blocks access to files, and demands a ransom for releasing it. After the ransom is paid, usually in the form of virtual cash, through means such as Bitcoin, the block may be released. Many ransomware attacks, like ransom seekers in real life, blackmail and harass the victim for prolonged periods of time. Sometimes, ransomware can block the user’s access to the entire device.

This is how ransomware usually spreads within networks: It appears as a seemingly innocuous mail, asking users to carry out the simplest of tasks such as opening attachments to get a surprise. Of course, most unsuspecting users would not be aware of the magnitude of such a surprise.

Once the user does this in anticipation of a ‘reward’; utter chaos could follow. The ransomware can cause disruption in entire affiliated networks. To set the whole damage right; it could take colossal efforts, lots of time, and unspeakable stress and tension.

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HIPAA has guidelines on how to deal with ransomware

It is but natural that there is a high degree of unease and anxiety among people in the US who deal with computer networks, given the extent to which the recent WannaCry ransomware attack spread panic over most parts of Europe and in other locations. Healthcare providers in the US are all the more worried because this ransomware attacked the National Health Service systems in the UK in particular. That they could be the next target is a strong possibility, which is why most healthcare providers need to take major steps to prevent such a ransomware attack. In fact, this recent WannaCry attack is only the latest in a series of attacks, of various types, on healthcare records. An extremely high number of over 100 million medical records were targeted in more than 250 different cyber incidents in the year 2015 alone.

Measures suggested by HIPAA

In view of these facts, and given its primary responsibility of ensuring the security, integrity and availability of medical records; HIPAA has come up with security measures aimed at preventing and countering these attacks. Predictably, these measures are pretty strong and stringent. The HIPAA Security Rule makes it a requirement from Business Associates and Covered Entities to carry out these tasks to check ransomware attacks:

  • Training needs to be imparted to users, consisting of both staff and the patients, on how to spot malware
  • Putting a security management process in place, the centerpiece of which is carrying out a Risk Analysis to identify the threats and to mitigate risks
  • Discussing the nature and enormity of the problem with patients and educating them on what they can and need to do to prevent attacks
  • Limiting the access to records and any sensitive information they contain
  • Taking appropriate data backups
  • Conceiving and implementing a disaster recovery program
  • Reporting and implementing security incident responses as laid out in 45 CFR 164.308 (a) (6)

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Effectiveness of these measures is difficult to assess

All the diligence on the part of the HHS notwithstanding; it has a long way to go in implementing HIPAA rules on ransomware. What does it do when, for instance, a PHI is never accessed? How does it term such an action as a breach of data security, when its own rules clearly state that reporting should be done only when there is a breach? What this means is that while some cases of PHI data breach get reported, many more don’t.

Education on how to deal with ransomware

A webinar from MentorHealth, a leading provider of professional trainings for the healthcare industry will set all these doubts at rest. The speaker at this webinar, Paul Hales, an expert on HIPAA Privacy, Security, Breach notification and Enforcement Rules with a national HIPAA consulting practice based in St. Louis, will show how to put these measures as required by HIPAA.

Please register for this webinar . This course is approved for 1 general credit from the Nevada Board of Continuing Legal Education.

At this webinar, Paul will explain everything relating to ransomware. The learning includes topics such as the HIPAA rules that relate to ransomware, what kind of “social engineering” tricks hackers use to fill ransomware into systems, how an organization can prepare itself when it is subjected to a ransomware attack, and best practices for preventing, preparing, responding and recovering from attacks.

He will also cover other areas at this webinar, and these include:

  • How to do a HIPAA Breach Risk Assessment to determine if a Ransomware attack resulted in a HIPAA Breach – or not – if the assessment demonstrates a low probability of compromise to PHI
  • What the HIPAA Breach Notification Rule requires when a Ransomware attack does result in a Breach of Unsecured PHI
  • The interconnected roles and responsibilities of Covered Entities and Business Associates under the HIPAA Breach Notification Rule concerning Ransomware attacks

HIPAA breach evaluation and reporting

Protected Health Information (PHI) is a very valuable piece of information. It is valuable for the patient, for the healthcare provider, and for the insurer. Unfortunately, there is one source to which it is more valuable than to all these: Hackers. Protected Health Information is meant to be protected, but this information is coveted in the black market more than credit cards and social security.

The reason is simple: The PHI contains very vital, but confidential information about a patient’s condition, as well as the medication she is under. When this information is hacked, it gives the most direct access to prescription habits, leading medical companies to target their marketing efforts at the most focused, pinpointed source at which their medicines are consumed. They can save loads of money on market research, advertising and many other activities with information obtained stealthily.

Hipaa data breach

The core aim of HIPAA is to prevent breaches

It is to prevent this from happening that the HIPAA was enacted. The HIPAA Breach Notification Rule, which was enacted in 2010, set out rules for defining a breach and the steps for reporting it to the US department of Health and Human Services (HHS). Significantly amended in 2013; HIPAA has rules on how to encrypt information according to federal standards set out by the government.

HIPAA has a clear definition of what constitutes a breach of information. It also defines what kind of act is considered a violation and what a reportable breach is. Although a variety of circumstances can result in a breach of privacy information; not all privacy violations need to be reported.

Guidelines from the HHS explain how to encrypt so as to obviate the need for notification in case data is lost. If entities fail at this, they can conduct a Risk Analysis to determine the probability of compromise of data using four factors:

  • What data was breached is and the ease with which it can be identified and located
  • The sourced to which this data was released, and if these sources are legally bound to protect the information
  • Whether or not there was actual exposure of the information
  • Whether or not proper steps have been taken to mitigate the incident.

Heavy penalties for noncompliance

Healthcare providers and those who have access to PHI for medical reasons need to get a grasp of exactly what constitutes a breach of information, and what and how to report. Although the HHS describes steps on how entities need to determine if a breach has happened and the ways to report it, if it needs to be reported; noncompliance is taken very seriously. A wrong move in this regard can hit them hard: $50,000 a day if the HHS determines that the noncompliance was a result of willful negligence.

Healthcare Organisation

All these aspects of HIPAA breach evaluation and reporting will be dealt with in detail at a webinar that MentorHealth, a leading provider of professional trainings for the healthcare industry, will be offering. Jim Sheldon-Dean, who is the founder and director of compliance services at Lewis Creek Systems, LLC, a Vermont-based consulting firm founded in 1982, providing information privacy and security regulatory compliance services to a wide variety of health care entities; will be the speaker at this webinar.

To enroll for this course and to get a complete understanding of all aspects of HIPAA breach evaluation and reporting, please visit .This course is approved for 1.5 general credits from the Nevada Board of Continuing Legal Education.

A complete understanding of what a breach is and how to report it

At this webinar, Jim will traverse the important areas of HIPAA, such as how to create the right breach notification policy for the organization and how to follow up when an incident occurs. He will also help participants understand what the HHS doesn’t consider a breach and in what circumstances entities don’t need to consider notifying it about a breach.

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The means of reporting the smaller breaches –meaning those involving less than 500 individuals –and the ways of avoiding a breach involving more than 500 individuals will be explained. Jim will also present a policy framework to help establish good security practices.

Jim will cover the following areas at this highly useful session on HIPAA breach evaluation and reporting:

  • The definition of a Breach under HIPAA
  • Evaluating the Privacy violation
  • Reviewing the exceptions to the definition of a breach
  • What is good enough encryption according to the rules
  • Performing the Risk Analysis to determine the necessity to report
  • Ransomware and Breaches – When to Report
  • Avoiding Breaches
  • The most common causes of breaches
  • Reporting breaches to HHS and the individuals
  • Reporting breaches to the press and other agencies
  • Documenting your analysis and decisions.

 

HIPAA should be implemented alongside MACRA and MIPS to foster better patient engagement

The Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015 (MACRA), a federal Act that governs the way in which physicians need to be paid when they treat patients who come to them under Medicare, alters and replaces the earlier Act in this regard, namely the Balanced Budget Act, which was in force from 1997

Since the Balanced Budget Act linked physician payments to budget cuts and economic growth; it brought down physician payments by 21 percent. MACRA, on the other hand, introduces the “pay-for-performance” programs called Merit based Incentive Payment System (MIPS) and Advanced Alternative Payment Models (APM’s), which are independent of the macroeconomic factors that were the criterion for physician payments earlier

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Patient engagement is at the core of MACRA

One of the highlights of MACRA is patient engagement. With technologies having become smarter; they come loaded with patient engagement tools that are indispensable. Technology may have brought features such as availability of secure patient portals and encrypted text message and email products, but most patients are still comfortable with non-secure communication tools like text messaging and email.

Patient engagement tools sent electronically by regular (unencrypted) email and text messaging include features such as appointment reminders, healthcare instructions, patient satisfaction surveys, and health and wellness newsletters and recall reminders. Since these are still prevalent, HIPAA has clear rules for sending Protected Health Information (PHI) by unencrypted electronic transmission. There is thus a clear link between MACRA, MIPS and HIPAA.

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The first of these HIPAA rules became effective with the passage of the HIPAA Omnibus Rule in September 2013. This was followed by guidances from the U. S. Department of Health and Human Services in 2014 and 2016.

Widespread violations have been the norm

From the time of the passage of these Rules and guidances; it has been noticed that there have been widespread violations of the HIPAA Rules for communicating with patients by unencrypted email and text message. The main reason for this is that Providers and Business Associates are not aware of the rules. Many of them have scant knowledge of what a PHI as defined by HIPAA really is.

Does this mean that there is no way out? There is. It is provided by the HIPAA Rules and HHS/OCR guidance, which provide a simple, easy-to-use, three-step Safe Harbor for using unencrypted email and text messaging to engage patients. This three-step HIPAA Safe Harbor frees Covered Entities and Business Associates from any responsibility or liability for unauthorized access to Protected Health Information (PHI) in unencrypted emails and text messages during transmission and after receipt by the patient.

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All about the three-step Safe Harbor

Want to know what this Safe Harbor is? To understand this and to stay compliant with the requirements set out in HIPAA and avoid causing violations to the HIPAA rules on communicating with patients by unencrypted email and text message; please register for a highly meaningful and relevant webinar from MentorHealth, a leading provider of professional trainings for the healthcare industry.

Paul R. Hales, an expert on HIPAA Privacy, Security, Breach notification and Enforcement Rules with a national HIPAA consulting practice based in St. Louis and the author of all content in The HIPAA E-Tool, an Internet-based, Software as a Service product for health care providers and Business Associates; will be the speaker. To make the most of his experience, please visit .

Paul will explain the three-step HIPAA Safe Harbor. They are easy to follow, but only when the steps are known.

This webinar for HIPAA Covered Entities and Business Associates will cover:

  • A clear explanation of the simple 3 Step HIPAA Safe Harbor that protects Covered Entities and Business Associates acting on their behalf from liability related to patient engagement by unencrypted email and text messaging
  • What makes an email or text message subject to HIPAA law
  • A clear explanation of how HIPAA defines PHI – it’s not just information about, for example, a diagnosis, disease, surgery or prescribed treatment
  • How a 2015 Federal Communications Commission Order about health care text messages added to confusion and what it really means – the 3 Step HIPAA Safe Harbor is the only text message Safe Harbor for Covered Entities and Business Associates
  • The interconnected liability of Covered Entities and Business Associates that provide unencrypted electronic patient engagement services like appointment reminders – and both can protect themselves.

This session will be of immense use to personnel who deal with PHI and other aspects of HIPAA, such as Hospital Trustees, C-Suite Executives, HIPAA Compliance Officials, HIPAA Privacy Officers, HIPAA Security Officers, Health Information Technology Supervisors, Practice Managers, Risk Managers, Dentists, Optometrists, Chiropractors, Physical Therapists, and Podiatrists.

How do campuses respond to students with mental issues?

Perhaps no educational campus is free of students with some or another kind of mental or emotional issues. Considering the wide diversity of students that enroll into American colleges and the varied backgrounds they come from; it is no surprise that American colleges will have to deal with such students.

There is a need for institutions that come across students with emotional or mental issues to learn to deal with the issue. While on the one hand, administrators of educational institutions need to lend a patient ear to address the needs of such students; on the other, they need to ensure that the campus is secure and safe for other students.

The institution faces serious challenges when students with emotional issues start causing disruptions for others. When these students are prone to bouts of violence and disorder; they are sources of discomfort to other students. This behavior could affect the peace in the institution and is a cause for anxiety in them. One of the ill desired consequences of such behavior could be student dropouts, which affects the reputation of the institution badly.

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Get to learn the ways of dealing with the issue

This crucial topic will be explained in depth at a highly educative webinar from MentorHealth, a leading provider of professional trainings for the healthcare industry. At this session, Aaron Hughey, who is a Professor in the Department of Counseling and Student Affairs at Western Kentucky University and has developed and implemented numerous workforce development initiatives over the last thirty years with local and regional companies, agencies and organizations; will be the speaker at this webinar.

Anyone in higher education who is involved in meeting the needs of students with mental health diagnoses and/or responding to unfortunate events precipitated by these individuals can get insights into how to manage these situations better by registering for this event.

A description of how to deal with a traumatic event

Aaron will explain what administrators, faculty and staff can do to meet the needs of students with mental health diagnoses better. He will also describe what can be done to assuage the apprehensions of those affected when an unseemly event occurs on campus. The more the college administration understands the characteristics of these students, the trauma they can potentially cause, and the impact it can have on all constituencies present on campus; the better, because this helps them to maintain a safe, secure, and educationally-focused campus environment.

The speaker will also show how to put in place a set of decision-making protocols that enables the efficient identification of risk factors, as well as a coordinated and ultimately successful intervention and recovery. An applications-oriented, hands-on approach to dealing with students with mental health disorders and the traumatic events they can potentially trigger will be offered at this session. With the many years of experience he brings into the topic; Aaron will show how to act in the best interests of both the student(s) involved, as well the campus as a whole.

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Resources need to be used properly and optimally

This webinar will elaborate on the many resources that are available at educational institutions for dealing with students with mental and emotional issues. However, these systems are rarely used by the student community, mainly because of the understandable stigma of being branded mentally unstable. They could also be short of using these resources because of lack of sufficient information about them, or not being thoroughly told about their uses.

Aaron will emphasize the ways by which to respond to undesirable and disturbing events at the campus and suggest ways by which to respond effectively by being amiable to both the person with the issue and the ones affected by his/her behavior. He will explain what steps can be taken to deal with them effectively before they go on to disturb peace in the campus.

Does fixing a retirement age for physicians help improve the healthcare system?

The medical profession is different from most others in one vital aspect: Practitioners of this profession don’t retire. The profession allows the physician to continue for as long as her physical and mental faculties allow her to. The US’ Supreme Court judges too, don’t retire, but theirs is judicial service, during which they are paid by the government, while a physician practices on her own.

This practice is built into the profession for many decades, and is one of the factors that motivate people to choose this profession. However, the medical profession needs to consider the consequences of this practice on the healthcare industry. Keeping this in mind, the American Medical Association, in a report released in early 2016, sought to develop guidelines for governing the efficiency of older physicians by introducing a screening procedure to test their competency in providing optimal, high quality healthcare.

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The AMA considers this topic to be important because the number of physicians aged over 65 has leapt by more than four times in the past four decades. An astonishingly high percentage -25% of all physicians in the US – are aged over 65.

Well-founded reasons

The AMA  lists the gradual loss of mental faculties such as judgment, hearing, sight and other related issues as being the cause for concern when physicians are allowed to practice beyond a ripe age, an age at which most other professionals such as pilots and military staff, whose decisions affect human lives directly, retire.

Expectedly, the reactions from the medical profession to the suggestions made in this report –one of over 250 on this topic by the AMA over the years –have been mixed. Some in the medical profession feel they are unnecessarily being fettered and asked to cast away a hard earned privilege, while others are more amiable to the idea of fixing a retirement age for physicians.

Causes for concern

From a healthcare industry perspective, some of the questions that come up with allowing a medical practitioner to continue to serve in the profession without retiring are:

  • Do physicians have the ability to serve their professions well when they enter old age?
  • How efficient and nimble can an aging physician community be in ensuring patient safety, and in filling shortage in the profession it serves, at the same time?
  • Should a retirement age be fixed for physicians?
  • Is it alright for medical staffs and hospitals to place restrictions on physicians based on age, and should hospitals and medical staffs do this?
  • If physicians perceive that they are victims of discrimination and civil rights violations; can they sue?

Getting the right perspective of the issue

MentorHealth, a leading provider of professional trainings for the healthcare industry, will seek to analyze and answer these questions at a webinar that it is organizing. The speaker at this webinar is Elizabeth A. Snelson, who represents medical staffs across the country, focusing on medical staff bylaws, and works for medical societies on medical staff issues.

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Interested in going in-depth into this vital question? Want to understand how aging physicians improve or undermine your healthcare service? In order to understand these and related questions, please register for this webinar.

Elizabeth will cover the following areas at this webinar:

  • Age Restrictions on Medical Staff membership and clinical privileges
  • State Laws affecting physician age restrictions
  • Federal laws affecting physician age restrictions
  • Accreditation requirements related to age-based credentialing
  • Implementation of age-based screening
  • Eligibility for peer review protection

Important personnel in the healthcare industry, such as Medical Staff President/Chief of Staff, those in Bylaws Committees or Credentialing Committees, Chief Medical Officer, Vice President of Medical Affairs,    Chief of Staff, Director of Medical Staff, Medical Staff Attorney, Hospital Counsel, Medical Staff Manager, Credentialing Specialist and Human Resources professionals; will gain important value and learning from this webinar.